NTSB Pushes for Federal “Connected Vehicle” Mandate to Reduce Accident Risks

The National Transportation Safety Board is calling on the federal administration to develop standards for vehicle communication technology, also called Connected Vehicle Technology.  The Board believes that the technology, if made mandatory in all automobiles, has the potential to dramatically slash accident risks.

A vehicle that comes with such advanced highway safety technologies is called a connected vehicle, and the National Transportation Safety Board wants such technology to be made available on all automobiles.  Basically, a vehicle that comes with this wireless technology makes use of Wi-Fi systems to communicate or transmit data with other vehicles in the vicinity.

The data can also be translated into warnings that caution other motorists on the road about a potential accident risk.  Vehicles are thus able to interact with each other wirelessly and learn of accident risks, thereby helping prevent accidents.

It’s very encouraging that the National Transportation Safety Board has finally chosen to talk about wireless technology.  The federal administration is currently testing the technology on at least 3,000 vehicles in Michigan.  However, the Board’s recommendations typically are not binding on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and other federal bodies.  In many cases, those recommendations remain just that, recommendations.  In some cases however, federal agencies may take the recommendations seriously, and act on them.  Any Missouri car accident lawyer would hope that the federal administration would do so in this case.

The technology seems very promising, and although it is probably not currently feasible, it is reasonable to believe that in the next few years, this technology will make its entrance on Missouri highways.

Doug Horn is a Missouri car accident attorney, dedicated to helping persons injured in car accidents in Missouri recover the compensation they deserve.