Increased Drowsy Driving Accident Risks this Summer

This summer, Missouri motorists are at a much higher risk of sharing the road with motorists who are driving while fatigued or drowsy.  Drowsy driving is a hugely underestimated accident factor, and is responsible for thousands of car accidents caused every year.

These accidents are very serious, because when a person is drowsy, he is unable to avoid an accident, and therefore, the accidents that result are high impact accidents that end with fatalities and injuries.  What makes the problem even greater is that Missouri, like most other states in the country, does not have any law that specifically prohibits motorists from driving while they are in a fatigued state.

The challenge seems to be that many motorists do not consider drowsy driving to be such a great risk.  While driving under the influence of alcohol is universally found repulsive, and many motorists will think not once or twice, but several times before driving under the influence of alcohol, many of them will not show the same kind of restraint or concern if they are asked to drive after having been awake for many hours at a stretch.

The risk of drowsy driving increases during summer, when so many people are staying up late at night, sleeping less than usual, and when normal sleep patterns change, especially those involving teenage drivers.  Besides, summer is when safety is not exactly a top priority for most motorists, and many may not think twice about driving while they are sleepy.

Another concern during summer is the high incidence of allergies, and the number of motorists driving under the influence of anti-allergy medications and anti-histamines.  Drowsiness is a side effect of many of these medications, and motorists may not realize that when they take these medications and then drive, they may be at serious risk of a drowsy driving accident.

Doug Horn is a Missouri car accident attorney, dedicated to helping persons injured in car accidents in Missouri recover the compensation they deserve.